Tiramisu Recipe

And today Sophie from the German Foodie and I are launching a  new monthly appointment: Cooked in Translation.

Cooked in Translation is going to be a monthly appointment. Every second Sunday we will interpret a classic international dish through the lens of our own or another culinary tradition. A hosting blogger chooses an iconic dish the dish and initiates the blog hop. Anyone who has some version of the iconic dish in question can link up its own fusion version of the dish.

This month I am hosting and I have chosen Tiramisu’. I am posting the classic version below. Sophie is posting her own creation on her blog and all of you can link your own version of tiramisu’ to the blog hop below.

If you link up, please leave a comment telling us what makes your version unique and share this page and the blog hop with your reader. You can twit it using #cookedintranlation, you can post it on Facebook or Google+ mentioning Sophie and I or you can simply mention it in the post you are sharing with us. The important thing is sharing. The more, the merrier! Plus aren’t you curious about what people do with tiramisu’?

My version is the classic Italian version. It contains mascarpone and raw eggs and makes for a really heavy, yet delicious dessert. I have always used raw eggs and am still alive, but if you are weary of raw eggs you can use pasteurized eggs.

Anyway, have a look at my recipe below, Sophie’s one on her website and share yours at the bottom of the post!

#CookedInTranslation: Tiramisu’

#CookedInTranslation: Tiramisu’

Ingredients

  • 16 oz. mascarpone
  • 8 oz. sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups coffee
  • 12 oz savoiardi (ladyfingers)
  • unsweetened cocoa powder

Directions

  1. Beat the mascarpone with the sugar.
  2. When it is creamy, add the egg yolks 1 at a time and beat until well incorporated. Taste the cream and see if you want to add more sugar. To me this is sweet enough, but the beauty of tiramisu’ is that it can be adjusted to your taste quite easily.
  3. Beat the egg whites to stiff picks and incorporate to the mascarpone cream. It will make it softer and fluffier.
  4. Quickly dip the savoiardi in the coffee. They absorb coffee and turn to mush very quickly, so don’t let them soak, just roll them in the coffee. By the way, I don’t add sugar to the coffee, beacuse I’m not for sweet stuff, but feel free to sweeten it up if you have a sweet tooth.
  5. Place 1/3 of the savoiardi on the bottom of a square pan so that they cover all the pan. Cover with 1/3 of the cream. Make a second layer of savoiardi and cover with the cream and then do a third layer.
  6. Finish off the tiramisu’ by dusting it with cocoa powder. Place in the fridge to solidify for a couple of hours. Serve cold.

Tower of sweet frittatine

Today we are back with Cooked in Translation! As you might know, cooked in translation is a monthly event where we interpret a traditional dish. This month Sophie from German Foodie choose Pfannekuchen which basically is the German version of pancakes. To participate link up your own Pfannekuchen or pancake and let your friends know!

What I did was frittatine, little frittate. In Italy, very thin frittate are sometimes used as crepes. Despite the fact that frittata is usually a savory dish, its flavor is actually quite neutral so that these thin frittate can be used a bit like crepes and stuffed with your favorite ingredients.

Of course, similar to crepes, you can layer fritattine with savory ingredients, but this time I  went for something a bit more unexpeted and made a dessert out of them . I topped the fritatine with yogurt and strawberry jam and got a pretty great and fresh dessert, perfect to round up a dinner.

On a separate note, my Chicken Sausages Giveaway is still open: remember to enter!

#CookedInTranslation: Tower of sweet frittatine

#CookedInTranslation: Tower of sweet frittatine

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • honey flavored greek yogurt
  • strawberry jam
  • salt
  • pepper (optional)
  • olive oil

Directions

  1. Beat the eggs with salt and a pepper. I know it sounds weird, but strawberry jam is so sweet, that a bit of pepper can be a welcome contrast.
  2. Warm up a medium nonstick pan and coat it with oil. Wipe the excess oil out and pour a bit of the egg in the pan. Quickly swirl around to obtain a thin frittata.
  3. Cook for about 20 sec and flip over. After another 10-20 seconds take the frittata off the fire and onto a dish covered with paper towels to absorb the oil.
  4. Keep cooking the frittatas and pile them up on a plate.
  5. Using a round cutter (or a glass) cut out 10 frittata rounds.
  6. Assemble the tower by placing a fritatta round on the bottom, then 1 tsp jam, another frittata round, 1 tsp yogurt, another frittata, jam, fritata, yogurt, fritata and top with a dollop of yogurt and jam.
  7. You can decorate with mint leaves.

Tuna Loaf

Every month a group of food bloggers gets together at cooked in translation to make a fusion version of a popular dish. The idea is for participating bloggers to interpret the recipe according to their cultural heritage. This month’s host Soni proposed to work with fish cakes. If you want to participate join us on Facebook and/or link up your favorite fish cake recipe. We are anxious to see what you have for us!

Now, when given this task, I immediately thought about making some kind of fish polpette (fishballs). I was thinking of doing ricotta and tuna balls, but I wasn’t convinced and so I started thinking about tunaloaf.  Tunaloaf is a dish my mom used to make for us as kids. It is a simple mix of canned tuna and mashed potatoes and is usually shaped into a loaf.

For cooked in translations, I decided to make it into tuna cakes by simply shaping the mixture in a patty. For full disclosure, this patties (or the meatloaf for what matter) tend to be a bit on the dry side, especially if you do not use good tuna. So choose your tuna well and serve with mayo!

Now is up to you! Get to the end of the post and link up your version of a fish cake!

Tunaloaf

Ingredients

  • 3 medium potatoes
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cans tuna
  • 3 tbsp capers
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • 3 anchovy fillets

Directions

  1. Boil the potatoes until they are fork tender.
  2. Mash the potatoes and let them cool down.
  3. Blend 1 can drained tuna with the parsley, capers and the anchovies.
  4. Mix the mashed potatoes with the blended tuna, the eggs and the other tuna roughly broken.
  5. Form into patties and place on an oven dish covered with parchment paper.
  6. Bake for about 20 minutes in a 400F turning the patties half way through cooking.
  7. Serve with mayo

3.1

Quick Pizza Recipe

Today is the day of cooked in translation. As you might know, cooked in translation is a monthly event where we interpret a traditional dish. This month I am hosting and I chose pizza which doesn’t need many introductions. To participate link up your own pizza recipe at the bottom of this post, visit my fellow cooks in translation’s blogs and let your friends know!

For my version of pizza I made puff pastry pizza. Which is obviously pizza made using puff pastry instead of regular pizza dough and it makes for a very quick, yet delicious version of pizza. Hope you will enjoy it!

#CookedInTranslations: Quick Pizza

#CookedInTranslations: Quick Pizza

Ingredients

  • 1 roll frozen puff-pastry dough
  • tomato sauce
  • your favorite toppings

Directions

  1. Thaw the puff pastry.
  2. Top it with tomato sauce and your favorite toppings (I choose cheese and olives)
  3. Cook for about 30 minutes in a 400F oven
  4. Serve hot or cold.

Italian Seafood Pasta

It is time to play with the Cooked in Translation recipe of the month. Each month a group of crazy bloggers gets together and plays with a classic recipe and offers an interpretation of a the dish that is in someway fusion. This month we are playing with fish soup and the original recipe that Stacy proposed was cajun redfish courtbuillon. Fancy, right?

And how does an Italian fusionize seafood soup? Simple: just add pasta! So that is what I did. And I took the ingredients of seafood soup and made a beautiful seafood pasta.

Hope you will enjoy it!

#CookedInTranslation: Seafood pasta

#CookedInTranslation: Seafood pasta

Ingredients

  • 1 lb spaghetti or linguine
  • 1 lb mussels
  • 1/2 lb littleneck clams
  • 10-12 peeled shrimp
  • garlic
  • oil
  • saffron
  • parsley

Directions

  1. Start boiling the water for pasta and cook it very al dente (about 3 minutes shy of the right cooking time).
  2. Meanwhile in a large pan or a wok, warm up some oil and use it to cook 2 clove of garlic keeping them whole. Once the garlic has browned, add in the mussels and the clams and sautee them for a couple of minutes until they open up. Get the clams out of the pan and filter their cooking liquid.
  3. Now warm up some more oil in the same pan, add two whole garlic loaves and when they are browned quickly cook the shrimp to the pan. Add back the shucked clams and their cooking liquid in which you dissolved the saffron. Save a couple of un-shucked clams to decorate
  4. Now add the semi-cooked pasta to the pan, add some chopped up parsley and mix well.
  5. Pour the dressed pasta on a sheet of aluminum foil and close the foil up in a packet so that the steam cannot escape. Add a bit of oil and water if the pasta is too dry. Place the foil packet in a hot oven for about 5 minutes.
  6. Serve piping hot.