Cherry Bars Dessert – The best Cherry Bars Dessert recipe

Cherry Bars

Cherry Bars are a wonderful dessert and treat for adult gatherings as well as kids’ parties. They can also serve as tasty snacks with milk or hot tea. Elegant or fun, these bars cover it all. Give it a try and you’ll see.

black cherry pie recipe

Ingredients:

  • 225g (8 oz) of butter, softened
  • 400g (14 oz) of sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 5ml (.16 fl oz) of vanilla extract
  • 1ml (.03 fl oz) of almond extract
  • 375g (13.2 oz) of all purpose flour
  • 6g (.20 oz) of salt
  • 1200g ( 42 oz) cherry pie filling

Glaze:

  • 120g (4.2 oz) confectioners’ sugar
  • 3ml (.10 fl oz) of vanilla extract
  • 3ml (.10 fl oz) of almond extract
  • 30ml (1 fl oz) of milk

Procedure:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F or 180 degrees C.
  2. Grease baking pan. In a mixing bowl, place butter and sugar.
  3. Cream together. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after adding each one.
  4. Add the vanilla and almond, beating to mix. In another bowl, combine the flour and salt.
  5.  Add this to the creamed mixture. Mix together until it is combined.
  6. Spread 750ml of the batter into the greased baking pan.
  7. Spread this with the pie filling. Drop the remaining batter over the pie filling by teaspoonfuls. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes.
  8. It is done when a toothpick inserted into the center of the bars comes out clear. Cool on a wire rack.
  9. Make the glaze and drizzle over the bars.

Once you try out these recipes, you will find out just out delicious they are. The first time you serve them to others, you can bet they will be in demand for all social events unless you decide to give out your recipes to others and let them make the desserts.

Baked Apples with Grapes Dessert recipe

Baked Apples with Grapes

Ingredients:

  • 4 large red apples
  • 2 teaspoons butter
  • 250 g (9 oz) seedless black grapes
  • good pinch of cinnamon
  • 4 walnuts for decoration whipped cream or ice cream

Baked apples with grapes

Syrup:

  • 375 ml (12.5 fl oz)  water
  • 250 ml (8.5 fl oz) white wine
  • 3 tablespoons golden syrup
  • 1 piece of lemon peel, no pith

Procedure:

  1. For the syrup: in a pan, combine wine, water, golden syrup and lemon peel.
  2. Bring to the boil, stirring and simmer for 3-4 minutes.
  3. Get rid of lemon peel.
  4. Meanwhile, peel and core the apples.
  5. Add apples to the syrup and cook for 10-12 minutes.
  6. Take the apples out and place in a greased ovenproof casserole.
  7. Add cinnamon and butter to the remaining syrup and stir.
  8. Add half the grapes and cook for 8-10 minutes, basting and stirring until soft and syrupy.
  9. Lift out the grapes and heap on top of apples pressing into core holes using a slotted spoon.
  10. Keep syrup in pan warm.
  11. Cover casserole and cook in a moderate oven for 20-25 minutes.
  12. Remove from heat.
  13. Add remaining grapes around apples and pour warm syrup over apples and grapes.
  14. Serve hot with whipped cream or ice cream.

From: www.dessertrecipes.org.uk

Making Speculoos cookies and a children’s trifle

We got back from our month-long trip to Greece and France, and I must admit it has
been a bit of a challenge to adapt back to “real life”. Probably because this
intense month of bonding with friends and (re)discovery and experience felt
more real than our so-called “real life”. Most of our time was spent
focusing on things that really matter, and very little time on menial things.
It just always makes me wonder, “What if life could always be this pure and
intense?” Part of me feels energized and motivated from the trip, and another
part feels sad, nostalgic and daunted by the mountain of things to do. I
must start cooking and writing in hope my spirits will lift.
In the meantime, I shall reminisce about a week in Normandy spent with our
friends Christelle and Jean-Max and their children, Calista, 9 and Philéas, 5.

 

 

These children are what I would
consider very French children (the kind Karen Le Billon talks about in her book). While they love pasta and sweets and French
fries, they are also quite the foodies. I was delighted to hear them critique
their school lunch menus (which are amazing by American standards, but
considered mediocre by most French parents), saying the food left to be
desired, the pasta was too greasy, and the meat overcooked. Philéas declared he
only liked a particular brand of Camembert cheese (he also went through a phase
where he declared himself a “cheese vegetarian”). And Calista professed her
love of cooking. When I asked what they liked to cook, they mentioned one of
their favorite desserts: the Speculoos trifle. At my puzzled look, they asked,
“What, you don’t know what a Speculoos is?” I was soon initiated. It turns out
a Speculoos is a very simple, yet tasty, cinnamon spice cookie, as widely known
as Oreos in the US.
It’s from Belgium
originally, but has become a favorite of the French (and of Amélie Poulain in the French film,
Amélie).

So we decide to make home-made Speculoos to use for
the trifle. The children bring out the ingredients, Philéas mixes, Calista knows
all about making a well in the dry ingredients to pour the wet. As we shape the
dough, Calista suggests adding more butter, as it is too dry. She’s correct,
that does the trick. We are in Normandy
after all, the land of cream and butter. In doubt, add more.

Watching Philéas getting so excited about making tonight’s
dessert, and Calista licking the bowl of cream, I feel thrilled at the idea of paying homage
to their gourmet spirit in this space. Their mother is a dear childhood friend of mine,
we’ve known each other since we’re 11, and the thought of our children cooking
and eating together couldn’t make me happier.
This dessert is very easy to make for children, and it is a wonderful refreshing treat for the whole family. The cookie softens
under the yogurt and the fruit adds a splash of sweetness. It is a reasonably healthy
treat, which I will make in Los Angeles,
if only to be transported back to Philéas and Calista Land, for a trifle in time.

Calista & Philéas’ Speculoos trifle

For the cookies (Prepare dough one day ahead)

(Original recipe found here)

2 cups all-purpose
flour

½ cup brown sugar

1 egg

1 tsp allspice

1 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp baking powder

½ cup (100 g) butter,
melted

In a large bowl, mix the flour, brown sugar,
allspice, cinnamon, salt and baking powder.
Make a well (hole) in the middle of the dry
ingredients and add the lightly beaten egg and melted butter.

Gently mix together (easier done with both hands)
to form a tube of dough that holds together (if too crumbly, add a little more
melted butter).

Wrap in plastic and keep in the fridge overnight or
more.

Preheat the oven at 350° F.

Cut into ¾ inch slices. Place them on a baking
sheet over parchment paper.

Bake in the oven for 10-15 minutes. Let cool.

(Recipe invented by Calista, 9, and Philéas, 5)

3 cups of Greek yogurt (use the creamiest you can find, and avoid 0% fat)

2 tbsp of crème fraîche

(*Alternatively, you can easily find and use whole
milk plain yogurt with cream on top)

2 tbsp Brown sugar

4-5 cups of cut-up fresh fruit (For us, it was 5
peaches and nectarines. Use what’s available in season, pears and apples in
winter, stone fruit in summer. Organic canned fruit could also be used)

Speculoos cookies
Lay Speculoos cookies flat to cover the bottom of a
serving dish.

In a bowl, mix the yogurt and cream. Then add the
brown sugar and mix.
Pour the yogurt mixture on top of the cookies, and
use a spoon to spread it evenly.

Place the fruit on top and place in the fridge
until ready to serve.

Hazelnut cookies recipe

.The holiday season has got me thinking about wants and expectations.

Pablo had a wonderful Christmas, and was quite showered with gifts. It was his first “aware” Christmas, he knew about Santa Claus coming and bringing gifts. And I have been debating for some time about what I want to tell him about gifts and Santa Claus, because I would like him to enjoy thinking of and making gifts to others too. And I would like him to recognize how thoughtful others have been to him. And yet, I would like him to experience Christmas as a child, with all the magic of Santa, Rudolph, stockings and the whole bit.

I have on occasion witnessed older children wanting something in particular, and being excited about wanting it, expecting to get what they want, and being completely uninterested and underwhelmed by the many other gifts they receive, which seems like such a shame and waste. It just feels so ungrateful and entitled somehow, it makes me cringe. They know they’re going to get what they want, so they expect it. Which got me wondering: are expectations the root of ungratefulness?

Entitled people I’ve encountered in my life have never seemed grateful to me. If we expect something, feel entitled to receive it as a matter of normality, then I suppose there’s nothing to be grateful for. And if for whatever reason, we don’t get what we expect, it can go one of two ways: we blame others, or we blame ourselves.

Yet again, life isn’t that simple.

Looking in the mirror, I realized this is something I have struggled with myself. Expecting to get the things that I want in life. That has certainly been the cause of some bitter disappointments (and self-blame). And I have learned just how crucial it is to differentiate quite clearly in my mind what I want from what I expect. When it involves other people and things outside of our control (and every part of living involves things outside of our control), we have no business expecting anything really. The only things we should expect, besides stuff like gravity, are things within our control, that involve ourselves, our effort, our work. I feel it’s OK to want something, just as long as I am fully aware I may not get it, or not the way I envisioned it. And to be all the more grateful when I do get it.

Kind of like, wanting with a grain of salt.

Wanting is less closed-minded than expecting. It seems easier to let go of wants than of expectations. Wants come and go. But our expectations are ingrained in our brains, they are that picture in our head, by which we measure success or failure. If our reality of the moment matches that picture, we have succeeded. If not, we have failed. But that is such a construct of our mind, far removed from real life, right here and right now. I am starting to think that succeeding is letting go of that picture, those expectations. And failing, is to never see beyond the expectations, and missing out on the many awesome unknowns and unsuspecteds life has in store for us.

So I’m learning to maintain a clear boundary between what I want and what I expect. Some things are better wanted than expected.

I guess that’s what I want Pablo to feel when “Santa” brings gifts to him. To want them, but not expect them. I would like him to want to receive gifts, sure. But only to expect giving them.

How does one teach that? How does one learn it?

Perhaps this is one of those things children learn by osmosis, if their models clearly make the difference in their life. I’m hoping to teach him this as I go, by keeping that boundary in my awareness as an individual and as a parent.

As I have previously reflected, I found the kitchen to be one excellent place to learn, and teach this. Take these cookies for example. They were not what I expected. The thin tollhouse type chocolate chip cookies. But I guess in the end, I just wanted them to be good. And when a cookie expert friend of mine came over, and had 4 in a row in spite of his wonderful usual will power, I figured they were good.

So here they are. They are not the graceful greyhound of cookies. They are more the big paws golden retriever of cookies (for some reason, a dog analogy came to mind…) Sweet, nutty, chunky. But I find myself loving them and enjoying them for what they are, as I write these very words…  I hope you will too.

Hazelnut chocolate chip cookies

Makes about 20 cookies

Prep time: 15 mn
Cook time: 15 mn + cool off time

Age for babies: After 12 months, in very small quantity as a treat. (I didn’t give Pablo chocolate until after 16 months.)

1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla extract
3/4 cup hazelnut butter
1 cup flour
1 tsp baking powder
a pinch of salt
3/4 cup chocolate chips

Preheat the oven at 375°F.

Line a large cookie sheet (or two) with parchment paper.

Beat the butter, sugar and brown sugar together until creamy. Add the egg & vanilla, and beat until smooth.

Add the hazelnut butter and beat until combined.

Add flour, baking powder and salt, and stir to combine. Add chocolate chips and stir again.

Drop small spoonfuls of dough onto the parchment. Bake 12-15 minutes.

Remove from oven and let rest on the sheet for 1 minute, before removing. Let cool on a rack, and keep in a tin box if possible.

Greek Butter Cookies Recipe (Kourabiedes) : Greek Recipes

Try these delicious Greek celebration cookies. Serve them at Christmas or a wedding or a party but never serve them at a funeral. With only 5 ingredients in this easy dessert recipe, anyone can make this treat.Ingredients to make Greek Butter Cookies Recipe:

4 Sticks Sweet, Unsalted Butter
½ cup powdered sugar
1 egg yolk
1 tsp. vanilla extract
5 cups flour

Instructions to make Greek Butter Cookies Recipe:

Melt butter in microwave on high in large microwave safe dish for thirty seconds. It doesn’t need to be completely melted. Pour melted butter into large mixing bowl and beat on high speed with a hand mixer until creamy in texture. Add powdered sugar and beat on low until sugar is mixed in and then move to high speed.

Beat on high for about a minute. Add egg yolk and vanilla extract and beat until well blended. Set mixer to medium and beat in flour until well mixed.

Mixture will be crumbly and eventually start to collect together.Preheat oven to 350. Roll dough into a 1 to a 1 ½ inch ball and flatten slightly with your hand. Place on ungreased cookie sheet an inch apart. Bake 15-20 minutes at 350 until cookie has a slight golden color.

Let cool completely on cookie sheet. Using a flour sifter, place extra powdered sugar in it and shake over the cooled cookies. I serve them in baking cups – it makes it a lot easier.