Potato dumplings

So another recipe swap at Burwell general Store has come. This time we are giving a try to Potato Donuts. Now I don’t like donuts, nor fried stuff, so I didn’t know what to do with this for the longest time, then at the last minute I had an inspiration. I was surfing on the web looking at random recipes when I stumbled on fruit stuffed potato dumpling.

The recipe is a classic Austrian dish and is pretty close in spirit to donuts, but it’s healthier because you don’t fry it. At the same time the dumplings are tossed in crispy breadcrumbs and that gives it an almost fried feeling, which makes it very satisfying despite the absence of pretty much any sugar. I was not a big believer, but I changed my mind when I tried the first dumpling!
The final result is a not too sweet dessert, that could be used also as a meal for little picky eaters or as the main course of a brunch.

Recipe swap: potato dumplings

Recipe swap: potato dumplings

Ingredients

  • 2 medium potatoes (about 3/4 lb)
  • 1/2 to 3/4 lb flour
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 apricots
  • 2 prunes
  • 3 spoons butter
  • 1/2 cup bread crumbs
  • cinammon
  • sugar
  • salt

Directions

  1. I started out by boiling my potatoes in lightly salted water until they were soft. Then I peeled them and mashed them using a potato ricer. I let the potatoes cool down and then I added in the first 1/2 pound of flour, 2 spoons of butter, the egg yolk and a pinch of salt. I mixed everything up adding flour as necessary. The dough should come together in a smooth and soft mass that doesn’t stick to the cooking surface.
  2. At this point I boiled a bit of water. I cut a cross on my fruits and quickly blanched them in the boiling water. After a couple of minutes I fished them out and I saved the water to cook my dumplings. I peeled the fruits and cut them open to remove the stones.
  3. I divided the dough in 4 parts and flattened out each bit. At the center of each piece of dough I placed one of the fruits and then closed the dough around it to form a ball the size of a baseball ball.
  4. I cooked the dumplings in boiling and lightly salted water (I used the water in which I blanched the fruit) for about 10 minutes.
  5. While the dumplings were cooking, I melted the remaining butter with a bit of cinamon in a pan and then added in the breadcrumbs. When the dumplings started floating, I fished them out and quickly tossed the dumplings with the breadcrumbs.
  6. Finally I transfered everything to a dish and sprinkled with sugar.
  7. Remember to check out what my fellow blogger did. You can find links to their recipes at Burwell general Store.

Roman Dumplings

Today I am proposing the recipe for Roman Dumplings AKA gnocchi alla romana. Gnocchi alla romana are a rather unknown version of gnocchi that is very popular in Italy, especially among kids. I remember loving them and looking forward to having some. I suspect that for my mom they were one of those pre-pakaged frozen dishes she did not want to give us too often because they were bad for us. But that only made them more tasty to me because they had that sort of bad for you aura that makes everything better.

These gnocchi are with semolino, which is a polenta made of semolina (durum flour). The semolino is enriched with cheese and eggs, spread in a 1 inch layer and then cut into gnocchi, which are then baked in the oven until browned. You can only imagine how delicious they are!

So  when it was time to settle on an Italian recipe for dumplings for World on a Plate, I decided to forgo the more well known dumpling recipes like gnocchi and ravioli and go for Roman Dumplings. Hope you enjoy them as much as I do!

#WorldOnAPlate: Roman Dumplings

Ingredients

  • 7 oz. durum flour
  • 3 and 1/4 cups milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan
  • 2-3 tbsp butter
  • salt
  • nutmeg

Directions

  1. Bring the milk to a simmer. Add 1 table spoon of the butter, a pinch of salt and a pinch of nutmeg.
  2. Stir the flour into the simmering milk using a whisk. Keep beating until the mixture thickens up and there are no lumps.
  3. Add half the cheese and stir it in.
  4. Add the eggs one at a time and mix until they are well incorporated.
  5. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and pour the semolino on top of it.
  6. Flatten the semolino into a 1/3 inch thick layer (you can use your hands for that) and let it cool down.
  7. Once the semolino has solidified, cut discs from the semolino.
  8. Butter up an oven dish and place the leftover semolino (what you could not cut into rounds) on the bottom. Sprinkle with grated parmesan and butter flakes.
  9. Arrange the gnocchi (the discs) in the oven dish into partially overlapping rows. Sprinkle with parmesan and butter flakes.
  10. At this point you can either place the oven dish into a 400F oven and cook it until the gnocchi are golden brown (abut 20 minutes) or place in the fridge (for up to 2 days) or the freezer (up to a month – maybe longer). When you are ready to eat the gnocchi, just cook them in the oven until they are warm throughout and golden brown.

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